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These car roof bars come with wordless (diagrams-only) fitting instructions that are difficult to comprehend and, in the case of a Peugeot 306 hatchback, specify the wrong assembly settings. The result is roof bars that cannot be fitted to the car or, at best, can be fitted only with extreme difficulty and at risk of damaging both the racks and the car body.
So, minus one star for false advertising about the end caps. And minus one star for claiming they don't rust, when I'm replacing them because the old ones are rusted. Otherwise, these things are super solid. I've had at least 2 stand up paddleboards and 2 surfboards on the car at once and there's no question these bars can withstand the strain from wind. If something were to break or bend in the whole car/rack combination, it's not going to be these bars in my opinion.
You see we've already got our front rail installed. Just use a reference mark here to make sure we have that in line. You're going to do the same thing here in the backside.Once we have that position from both sides, we want to check the overhang that we have on our bars. We'll just add as well. The overhang's going to be this portion here. I just want to make sure we have equal overhang on both sides. It doesn't have to be perfect, but it certainly looks better if it is. All right. Once we've got that where we want it, you want to grab the tool that is provided. This is a torque limiting tool, so basically it's going to tell us when we have our bars tightened down all the way. This is a four nanometer tool. Right here it says Ford inaudible 00:02:09 Newton meter, this is a Ford Newton meter clamp. So, we'll just start tightening this up. I like to snug this one down pretty well. Make sure that this portion here comes over and makes contact with my race side rail there. Once I get that pretty snug, I'm going to go over and do that other side.Now, these roof rack systems are going to be an excellent way to free up some space inside your vehicle of course. Bike racks, cargo carriers, rooftop cargo boxes, kayak carriers, just all kinds of different accessories that you can put up here on the roof line. Ski and snowboard carriers or really the enclosed ones, even if you want to transport some luggage and stuff like that, keep them out of the elements. Now I'm gonna go ahead and torque this one down until my tool indicates, you see that's just like a gas cap basically. Once it's tight enough, it's just going to click. Same thing here.Now with the Evo Bar, something I do like, you see this cap is going to come right open. That allows us to get into our T-slot accessory and no longer do we have to remove the long rubber strip and cut it. Our accessory can slide right in that gap and almost self seals right around it. Makes it really easy to use. Just pop that back down like that. To finish up our install though, we do want to cap off our end caps here. Tab here is going to go on the top, push that bottom in and at that point, you'll just rotate this 180 degrees into it's locked position to lock that cap on. These are just plastic cores. You can do these using a screwdriver, so if you wanted additional security, you want it to be able to lock and we do have the Thule locking keys you can put in there and then actually have a key lock to keep that nice and protected.The bars do come in a black or a silver, so if you wanted something to blend in with the Cherokee, I'd go with the silver. You want something to stand out, I'd go with the black and then I'll show you on that front bar here on the bottom side, once we get everything in position, we've got a little tab right here. We pull that tab over to our foot pack. That's going to eliminate any gaps in the bottom of that crossbar. Really going to help to eliminate wind noise. You can see right here, just gonna pull that over. It's going to close up that gap. Same thing on our front bar. Th
I originally purchased my Thule rack system in 1985 (for use on a Land Cruiser) and ‘upgraded’ in 1990 to the new style Thule racks (for a 4Runner), so I have a fair amount of experience with these racks. Although I have not purchased much new Thule gear lately, all of my 15-20 year old accessories work great. I use the 58” bars in the winter to hold my ski carrier and box. In the summer I use 78” bars to hold 2-3 canoes or kayaks, plus bikes. Given that most of my gear is so old, it is made of solid aluminum and steel and hasn’t given me one failure. Sure, I broke a fairing when I hit a flying rock at 60mph. And, I’ve lost a few of the nuts and nylon bar ends but these were easily replaced. But never have I had a fear of the rack coming off my truck. I’ve even caught a tree with one of my 78” bars, which bent the roof of my 4Runner pretty good. Still, the rack did not budge. My rack has spent a lot of time in Alaska and Minnesota winters and rust has never been much of a problem, either.
Aluminium bars include T-track slots which allow you to use the full length of the bars for load carrying. The WingBar not only looks good but more importantly includes a device which reduces wind noise to the minimum, as well as reducing drag. Many customers leave their Thule WingBars in place from week to week, especially if they are taller vehicles and fitting is awkward.
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