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I must confess that I've used the 815s without bow or stern tie-downs, but my two kayaks have not budged at all. I peek at them through the moonroof on my car from time to time, and they've never shifted. It's important that you read the directions on how to secure the two strap assemblies. If you do it correctly, they will not loosen. Thule's buckle bumpers are pure genius for protecting your car and your boat. When I get home one night with only one kayak on the roof, I entered my garage before the door had fully opened. The bow of the kayak hit the bottom lightweight insulated aluminum panel of my garage door and crumpled it, but the kayak didn't budge (nor did it get damaged, phew!). However, in the interest of safety, I have resolved to use bow and stern tie-downs in the future. To this end, I have purchased and installed bow hood loops from Riverside Cartop Carriers on my car.

Solid square load bar for kayak/canoes. It fits my 9.5 ft kayak along with my 14 canoe old town next to each other with additional space left over. It would not fit 2 kayaks and canoes flat. It does not stick out any further than mid part of side mirrors on my yukon. It is compatible with the load bar from thull. Only complaints that I noticed is that the coating is not very durable as I have a huge gash across one of the bars (not sure if from the rounded part of canoe bolt end or from combo of heat/pressure); also the rack will make a whirling noise when traveling on highways (55mph and up) which is very noticeable unless radio is on; I remove the racks during off seasons so it does not bother me at all but I can see when you may consider their additional part that blocks the wind for it from thull. I know some mentioned end caps may fall out but I have not had that issue although I put silicone (same stuff for plumbing or pool o rings) around the inside part to keep out moisture which may have helped that issue.
I purchased a 2015 F150 and needed to upgrade my load bars for my Thule Kayak Hullavator system. I was using 58" bars on a 2013 F150 and they were just barely long enough. After measuring the old bars (58") on the new truck, I was worried they wouldn't be wide enough for my Hullavator system so I purchased the 65" bars (as suggested by Thule). I'm glad I did as the shorter bars would have allowed the kayak lift to hit the side of my truck.
Ordered a rack as a Xmas present with heaps of time for delivery. Their email said it was sent. No it wasn't. Had to make other Xmas arrangements in the end. When I called to cancel I was told that they weren't actually sure if it had been sent or not so wait a few days. WTF??? Waited a few days and still no rack. They then agreed to refund but it took a while for the money to show up (admittedly this was probably due to Xmas shutdown).
The rear strap design now requires the strap to go at an angle rather than directly over the wheel (as with previous Thule rack models). Make sure that you twist the strap clasp lock as well so it points to about 2 o’clock. I’m not entirely sure why this aspect of the design was changedm the straight-through strap always seemed fine to me and was more easily stowed away.
If you're into kayaking, chances are you dream about living in a beach house, dragging your kayak through the fine sand to the water with ease. It will then be just a matter of minutes until you can start paddling away into the beautiful paradise. Now, let's wake up and face reality, most of us are not lucky enough to own such a place. In fact, you probably have to drive miles in order to enjoy this experience. Therefore, finding the best kayak roof rack is a must.
Usually two bars that run across the width of the vehicle roof, which you then mount your activity-specific racks to; whether it’s ski racks, bike racks, cargo boxes, kayak racks, etc. Crossbars support the weight of all the gear you’re adding to the roof and transfer the weight to the towers/feet. The major crossbar types include: round (Yakima), square (Thule, Inno), aerodynamic (Thule, Yakima, Whispbar, others), and factory. 

On your car roof, one these 3 alternatives will most likely be possible: a bracket specific to your roof shape that clips into the door frame: attachments for a dealer installed roof rail; OR a T-track. This review assumes that you have already figured out how to get two roof bars on your car roof – and that can be somewhat convoluted if you have an unusual car, good luck!


You see we've already got our front rail installed. Just use a reference mark here to make sure we have that in line. You're going to do the same thing here in the backside.Once we have that position from both sides, we want to check the overhang that we have on our bars. We'll just add as well. The overhang's going to be this portion here. I just want to make sure we have equal overhang on both sides. It doesn't have to be perfect, but it certainly looks better if it is. All right. Once we've got that where we want it, you want to grab the tool that is provided. This is a torque limiting tool, so basically it's going to tell us when we have our bars tightened down all the way. This is a four nanometer tool. Right here it says Ford inaudible 00:02:09 Newton meter, this is a Ford Newton meter clamp. So, we'll just start tightening this up. I like to snug this one down pretty well. Make sure that this portion here comes over and makes contact with my race side rail there. Once I get that pretty snug, I'm going to go over and do that other side.Now, these roof rack systems are going to be an excellent way to free up some space inside your vehicle of course. Bike racks, cargo carriers, rooftop cargo boxes, kayak carriers, just all kinds of different accessories that you can put up here on the roof line. Ski and snowboard carriers or really the enclosed ones, even if you want to transport some luggage and stuff like that, keep them out of the elements. Now I'm gonna go ahead and torque this one down until my tool indicates, you see that's just like a gas cap basically. Once it's tight enough, it's just going to click. Same thing here.Now with the Evo Bar, something I do like, you see this cap is going to come right open. That allows us to get into our T-slot accessory and no longer do we have to remove the long rubber strip and cut it. Our accessory can slide right in that gap and almost self seals right around it. Makes it really easy to use. Just pop that back down like that. To finish up our install though, we do want to cap off our end caps here. Tab here is going to go on the top, push that bottom in and at that point, you'll just rotate this 180 degrees into it's locked position to lock that cap on. These are just plastic cores. You can do these using a screwdriver, so if you wanted additional security, you want it to be able to lock and we do have the Thule locking keys you can put in there and then actually have a key lock to keep that nice and protected.The bars do come in a black or a silver, so if you wanted something to blend in with the Cherokee, I'd go with the silver. You want something to stand out, I'd go with the black and then I'll show you on that front bar here on the bottom side, once we get everything in position, we've got a little tab right here. We pull that tab over to our foot pack. That's going to eliminate any gaps in the bottom of that crossbar. Really going to help to eliminate wind noise. You can see right here, just gonna pull that over. It's going to close up that gap. Same thing on our front bar. Th
The Thule VeloCompact 92501 is one of the Swedish company's most affordable towball racks and it's really easy to use. It has a wide range of adjustment to suit different types of bikes, and it's very solid and secure. When it's fitted you can still get into your car boot, and it folds flat for storage. It's a good investment for anyone who regularly transports bicycles on a car.
Dear Phil, I have read over the reviews you sent us regarding the Thule Hull-a-Port. Being the manager in charge of returns, warranties, and exchanges at the Rack Warehouse I have had some experience with the problems noted in the reviews. The problem of the plastic mounting hardware breaking has happened before, but it is not at all common. Since we have sold the Hull-a-Port, we have had two sent back to us for warranty of this problem. Both of these racks came back last year (the first year this product was available), and this year's Hull-a-Ports have not been any problem for us. We have sold hundreds of units this summer, without one call about this problem. Usually people get back to us right away if there are problems with the system we sent them. I suggest the Hull-a-Port as an option for many people because of its ease of use and flexibility. If you are worried about the mounting brackets, I would suggest following one of the reviewer's advice and secure the boat down to the bar as well. I always use the load bar to secure my straps because the bars are always stronger than the accessory on top of them. Also, both the box the rack comes in and the instructions tell you that the bow and stern strap is required. To be on the safe side and ease your mind, use the bow / stern straps. Please call me if you have more questions or concerns. Thank you, Mary S., The Rack Warehouse 800-272-5362
Originally I bought them because our car didn't have the width for two boats to sit side-by-side. But they support our plastic touring boats (Necky, Looksha IV), very nicely. The fear of oil-canning the hulls by supporting them in traditional saddles is all but gone. The hull-a-ports hold the boats vertically and in even the strongest cross winds, the two straps (provided, with buckle bumpers) are enough to hold the boats in place with ease...and not so much pressure that you'll bend the hulls.

Locking Cables – These are essentially built-in security devices that wrap a sturdy chain around your bike and lock it into place. This has the obvious advantage of protecting your bike from any opportunistic thieves who could look to steal it straight off the rack. Bear in mind that typically you’re only going to see this feature included as standard on the more premium models. Some of the products we looked at above did have a locking cable as an option to buy separately, so check if the rack comes pre-equipped if you want a cable.


Well I dont even trust factory racks because of the loads I often carry and for this reason I bought a Mit. Montero with gutters-could have had a newer Monte but the gutters are gone as with most newer SUV's, the gutters allowed the use of Thule bars attached to gutters and not factory racks with stated capacities of around 100 pounds, since I am often carrying two Brittish boats and a fully loaded Thule box in the middle I felt better ultimately attaching to the gutters...using this system I have traveled to Canada and to Key West and to the OBX with the load listed above (with at least 70 pounds of gear in the Thule Box...and have had no problems (yet!)...I do tie down the kayaks from both stern and bow for these trips of 500-1000 miles and also tie down the boats to the bar...I use a combo of Hully Rollers and H20 Saddles...and at every stop check the boat straps.

Roof bars are an essential item if you want to fit a roof mounted cycle rack to your car. Designed to work with a car roof rail system roof bars are the base for attaching a range of car roof storage systems including cycle roof racks. Roof bars like the Thule Gutterless Rapid System are available for cars with normal roofs that don’t feature roof rails.


Thule Rack mounted to factory rack on a VW station wagon. H2go Saddles in front, Hydroglides in back. Likes: Strength of system. Dislikes: All the saddles. Hydroglides can easily scratch the boat while you are getting the end on them, I need to set an ensolite pad on them to keep them open. The spring on one pad has broken in less that 10 kayak carrying days. I would much rather have used covers on standard saddles, see yakrackbooties.com (paddling.com sponsor). Also need to permanently fix a pad to the bar between the saddles. The H2go pads do not conform as well as they could. I bet the old ones with the three position locking tabs were better. They need more springiness. If Thule made the saddles as well as they make the bars and towers I would be a lot happier with the product. If they do not improve, I am not sure whether I would buy them again regardless of their superior strength. I have no affiliation with any paddling industry company.
There are a number of roof rack manufacturers providing equipment that although suits a purpose, is not suitable for carrying canoes, kayaks or bikes as it cannot handle the weight of these items. We exclusively sell Thule roof racks and cycle carriers which are well designed and can handle the weight and bulk of modern sports equipment. We don't sell anything we wouldn't be happy using ourselves and we're a picky bunch!
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